END GAME

 

 
 
What’s so funny about this? When I received this joke, it was written with the word “pants” instead of britches. But that’s never how I’ve heard the idiom. To me, it’s always been “too big for your britches.” So that’s what I changed it to. However, I’ve opened up a new kettle of fish, or a new messy problem. First, let’s dispense with the “pants” issue. You may know these in their British variant, “trousers” - fine. But the linguistic issue that I’ve raised is that “britches,” unbeknownst to me, is actually southern U.S. slang for breeches. Specifically, “breeches” is a British term for horseback riding pants which are puffy above the knees and snug from the knees to the ankle. But I always thought that “britches” was an old fashioned term for pants, ANY kind of pants. I was unaware of its southern origin. In fact the “southern origin” is actually an older alternate spelling of breeches, going back to the early 1600’s. What does the expression actually mean? Simply, it raises the image of a boy outgrowing childhood pants. Metaphorically, it means even though you may have accomplished a thing or two in sports or academics or whatever, your acting and/or attitude is too haughty for your actual skills. In other words you’re not nearly as smart or skilled as you think you are, or are acting. The joke warns that eventually the world will realize that you are a fake. Your lack of skill or talent will finally be revealed or exposed in the end. But “end” can also mean “rear end” or your “butt.” So we have a coming together of elements here that say, that if you get too big for your britches and act like you’re better than everyone else, then the final or end result will be your exposure. We will all get to see the naked truth of your humiliation.  And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

This pun was sent to me by Bob Wiener

Listen to my audioboo:  https://audioboo.fm/boos/1920423-end-game

END GAME

 

 

 

What’s so funny about this? When I received this joke, it was written with the word “pants” instead of britches. But that’s never how I’ve heard the idiom. To me, it’s always been “too big for your britches.” So that’s what I changed it to. However, I’ve opened up a new kettle of fish, or a new messy problem. First, let’s dispense with the “pants” issue. You may know these in their British variant, “trousers” - fine. But the linguistic issue that I’ve raised is that “britches,” unbeknownst to me, is actually southern U.S. slang for breeches. Specifically, “breeches” is a British term for horseback riding pants which are puffy above the knees and snug from the knees to the ankle. But I always thought that “britches” was an old fashioned term for pants, ANY kind of pants. I was unaware of its southern origin. In fact the “southern origin” is actually an older alternate spelling of breeches, going back to the early 1600’s. What does the expression actually mean? Simply, it raises the image of a boy outgrowing childhood pants. Metaphorically, it means even though you may have accomplished a thing or two in sports or academics or whatever, your acting and/or attitude is too haughty for your actual skills. In other words you’re not nearly as smart or skilled as you think you are, or are acting. The joke warns that eventually the world will realize that you are a fake. Your lack of skill or talent will finally be revealed or exposed in the end. But “end” can also mean “rear end” or your “butt.” So we have a coming together of elements here that say, that if you get too big for your britches and act like you’re better than everyone else, then the final or end result will be your exposure. We will all get to see the naked truth of your humiliation.  And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

This pun was sent to me by Bob Wiener

Listen to my audioboo:  https://audioboo.fm/boos/1920423-end-game

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