GOODY TWO SHOES

Origin:  This expression comes from the title of a nursery tale entitled The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes, which was published in the mid-18th century.  The story was possibly written by Oliver Goldsmith. The story similar to the tale of Cinderella; the moral is that if you act correctly and with virtue, you will be rewarded. “Goody Two-Shoes” is the name given to a poor orphan - Margery Meanwell. She is so poor that she only owns one shoe.  She is so happy when a rich man gives her a complete pair that she keeps repeating that she now has ‘two shoes’. This is how she got her name. Eventually by working hard she does well and marries a wealthy widower. This story remained popular down through the centuries. Then around the beginning of the 20th century people who acted in a self-righteous way or super well-behaved were called “goody-goodie”. It’s not surprising that Goody Two Shoes  became intertwined with someone who was considered a goody-goody. And that’s the usage that exists to this day. 

Usage:  Informal, spoken, general American and British English; considered to be an old fashioned idiom. It is generally considered derogatory or insulting

Idiomatic Meaning:  Someone who thinks and acts as if he or she was better than everyone else; acting self-righteously, that is convinced they are right about everything and being morally superior to others

 Literal Meaning: Other than the name of the character in the nursery tale, the name could be any goody-goody type of person who owns two shoes.

Why is this funny? In the illustration we see a combination of the literal and idiomatic meanings. This dorky-looking guy with two shoes is acting in a very self-righteous manner and driving everyone else crazy but his speech and actions

 

Sample sentence: At church Mary was a total Goody Two Shoes; she would not let anyone curse or swear in her presence. But at night, at the bar, it was a different story.

GOODY TWO SHOES

Origin:  This expression comes from the title of a nursery tale entitled The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes, which was published in the mid-18th century.  The story was possibly written by Oliver Goldsmith. The story similar to the tale of Cinderella; the moral is that if you act correctly and with virtue, you will be rewarded. “Goody Two-Shoes” is the name given to a poor orphan - Margery Meanwell. She is so poor that she only owns one shoe.  She is so happy when a rich man gives her a complete pair that she keeps repeating that she now has ‘two shoes’. This is how she got her name. Eventually by working hard she does well and marries a wealthy widower. This story remained popular down through the centuries. Then around the beginning of the 20th century people who acted in a self-righteous way or super well-behaved were called “goody-goodie”. It’s not surprising that Goody Two Shoes  became intertwined with someone who was considered a goody-goody. And that’s the usage that exists to this day.

Usage:  Informal, spoken, general American and British English; considered to be an old fashioned idiom. It is generally considered derogatory or insulting

Idiomatic Meaning:  Someone who thinks and acts as if he or she was better than everyone else; acting self-righteously, that is convinced they are right about everything and being morally superior to others

 Literal Meaning: Other than the name of the character in the nursery tale, the name could be any goody-goody type of person who owns two shoes.

Why is this funny? In the illustration we see a combination of the literal and idiomatic meanings. This dorky-looking guy with two shoes is acting in a very self-righteous manner and driving everyone else crazy but his speech and actions

 

Sample sentence: At church Mary was a total Goody Two Shoes; she would not let anyone curse or swear in her presence. But at night, at the bar, it was a different story.

  1. poppingcandygoesmoo reblogged this from rollsoffthetongue
  2. cannabiscouple reblogged this from rollsoffthetongue and added:
    Goody two shoes?
  3. rollsoffthetongue posted this
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