NO THIRD STRIKE

 

 
What’s so funny about this? You’ve got to admit Steven Wright has a bizarre yet very clever mind. He pays very close attention to individual words and can just nail it when language is irrational or not logical.  Today’s joke is a great example. It’s based on a common saying “You scared me half to death!” It’s also common to hear “You scared me to death!” the latter makes a little more sense and yet clearly the speaker is not a liar nor a zombie, nor dead. It’s just an exaggeration or hyperbole to indicate extreme fright. The former saying hedges by 50%. The speaker is not dead, nor a zombie. He or she is only half dead, depending on whether you’re a glass half-full or empty kind of guy. You could be relieved that you’re only half dead or you could be upset that already you’re half dead. All depends on your perspective. Leave it to Steven Wright to focus on the literal sense of the words spoken. He’s realized that two halves make a whole so if you are literally scared half to death two times then you should be fully dead. This also means that you shouldn’t really be able to talk. Since you are, then you are either lying, exaggerating or a zombie. But wait, maybe there’s a mathematical sequence we can apply here. Maybe each time you get scared half to death it’s only half of the time you have left. In this case you will always be getting less and less scared and you will live forever, because you can keep halving until infinity. And THAT’s what’s so funny! 
 
podcast - https://audioboom.com/boos/2521208-no-third-strike

 

This joke was written by Steven Wright

NO THIRD STRIKE

 

 

What’s so funny about this? You’ve got to admit Steven Wright has a bizarre yet very clever mind. He pays very close attention to individual words and can just nail it when language is irrational or not logical.  Today’s joke is a great example. It’s based on a common saying “You scared me half to death!” It’s also common to hear “You scared me to death!” the latter makes a little more sense and yet clearly the speaker is not a liar nor a zombie, nor dead. It’s just an exaggeration or hyperbole to indicate extreme fright. The former saying hedges by 50%. The speaker is not dead, nor a zombie. He or she is only half dead, depending on whether you’re a glass half-full or empty kind of guy. You could be relieved that you’re only half dead or you could be upset that already you’re half dead. All depends on your perspective. Leave it to Steven Wright to focus on the literal sense of the words spoken. He’s realized that two halves make a whole so if you are literally scared half to death two times then you should be fully dead. This also means that you shouldn’t really be able to talk. Since you are, then you are either lying, exaggerating or a zombie. But wait, maybe there’s a mathematical sequence we can apply here. Maybe each time you get scared half to death it’s only half of the time you have left. In this case you will always be getting less and less scared and you will live forever, because you can keep halving until infinity. And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

podcast - https://audioboom.com/boos/2521208-no-third-strike

 

This joke was written by Steven Wright

What’s so funny about this? We’re WAY overdue for a limerick. So I’m bringing you a classic one with an opening line that’s been used in many, quite dirty limericks However, this one has a twist - it’s not dirty at all, so I can use it for this podcast with a clear conscience. By the way, you may have noticed that the website has changed its name from audioBOO to audioBOOM. So technically, this is not a podcast, a name that makes you think of IPads and IPods. Instead, you are supposed to think of this as a new audioboom. Good luck with that. Anyway, the first line of the limerick tells us there’s an old man who lived in place called Nantucket, an island off the coast of the US state of Massachusetts. It has a sister island, a little closer to the mainland, called Martha’s Vineyard.  Both are now resort islands for the rich and famous. But back in the day, Nantucket was famous as a whaling center and is mentioned in Herman Melville’s great book about whaling, called Moby Dick. Nantucket has the distinction of rhyming with many dirty words, but in today’s limerick, it rhymes, in the second line, with “bucket”, a term you probably know. If not, it’s a round, cylindrical wooden or metal container usually with a handle, used to carry things like water or sand. This old man didn’t believe in banks. Instead he kept all his money in this same bucket we’re talking about.
The old man also has a daughter who’s name happens to be Nan, short for Nancy. Nancy is in her twenties and is very attractive and probably not too happy to be still living at home on Nantucket. So she decides to run away with some guy who remains unnamed in our little poem. We also know that Nan’s father did not hide his bucket of cash. It must have been in plain sight, because not only did Nan run away with a man, she stole her old man’s, or her father’s, bucket with all the money in it. You might object here, saying that the poem makes no mention of thievery. But if you look at the last line, it ends with the word Nantucket. If we break this word down we get Nan-tuck-it. She took the bucket, Nantucket.   And THAT’s what’s so funny!
 
 
Podcast - https://audioboom.com/boos/2518347-no-bucket-list

What’s so funny about this? We’re WAY overdue for a limerick. So I’m bringing you a classic one with an opening line that’s been used in many, quite dirty limericks However, this one has a twist - it’s not dirty at all, so I can use it for this podcast with a clear conscience. By the way, you may have noticed that the website has changed its name from audioBOO to audioBOOM. So technically, this is not a podcast, a name that makes you think of IPads and IPods. Instead, you are supposed to think of this as a new audioboom. Good luck with that. Anyway, the first line of the limerick tells us there’s an old man who lived in place called Nantucket, an island off the coast of the US state of Massachusetts. It has a sister island, a little closer to the mainland, called Martha’s Vineyard.  Both are now resort islands for the rich and famous. But back in the day, Nantucket was famous as a whaling center and is mentioned in Herman Melville’s great book about whaling, called Moby Dick. Nantucket has the distinction of rhyming with many dirty words, but in today’s limerick, it rhymes, in the second line, with “bucket”, a term you probably know. If not, it’s a round, cylindrical wooden or metal container usually with a handle, used to carry things like water or sand. This old man didn’t believe in banks. Instead he kept all his money in this same bucket we’re talking about.

The old man also has a daughter who’s name happens to be Nan, short for Nancy. Nancy is in her twenties and is very attractive and probably not too happy to be still living at home on Nantucket. So she decides to run away with some guy who remains unnamed in our little poem. We also know that Nan’s father did not hide his bucket of cash. It must have been in plain sight, because not only did Nan run away with a man, she stole her old man’s, or her father’s, bucket with all the money in it. You might object here, saying that the poem makes no mention of thievery. But if you look at the last line, it ends with the word Nantucket. If we break this word down we get Nan-tuck-it. She took the bucket, Nantucket.   And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

 

Podcast - https://audioboom.com/boos/2518347-no-bucket-list

CAN YOU GUESS THE IDIOMATIC EXPRESSION REPRESENTED BY THIS CARTOON?

CAN YOU GUESS THE IDIOMATIC EXPRESSION REPRESENTED BY THIS CARTOON?

sign of the times

sign of the times

mapsontheweb:

Writing systems of the world

mapsontheweb:

Writing systems of the world

What’s so funny about this? This particular joke is a little tricky because of the differences in spelling between British and American English. Specifically, I’m talking about the word Americans spell as t-i-r-e, and which Brits spell t-y-r-e. The difference is  only noticeable  in writing, because the two words are homophones, that is, pronounced identically and they mean the same thing too. But they are not homographs. In listening to the joke, you cannot tell which spelling I’m using. The American spelled “tire” is also a homonym of the same word which means to either wear someone out or to be worn out, fatigued. This joke wouldn’t work at all with the British spelled TYRE. Every time I see this word spelled the British way, I have to look twice and try to remember what it means. So exactly what is going on in the cartoon? A muscular woman bike racer is riding down a street without holding her handlebars. She see a guy who, not in great physical shape, standing next to a bicycle and holding it up by the seat. She must be in a good mood because she yells to the guys, asking why he’s holding up his bicycle. He answers her, explaining that the bike is too tired to stand alone. This sounds like an obvious answer since the bike, only having two tires would fall down without human support. If it were a tricycle with three tires, it could, in fact, stand alone.  But there is a pun at work here, namely “tire” which can also be a verb and the adjectival form “tired,” as in exhausted, having no energy. When people are too tired to stand alone, they need human support. It appears that this bike has the same needs. And THAT’s what’s so funny!
 
This joke was sent to me by my former singing buddy, Jim Offner.                                                     
 
Podcast - https://audioboom.com/boos/2516957-bike-psyche                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

What’s so funny about this? This particular joke is a little tricky because of the differences in spelling between British and American English. Specifically, I’m talking about the word Americans spell as t-i-r-e, and which Brits spell t-y-r-e. The difference is  only noticeable  in writing, because the two words are homophones, that is, pronounced identically and they mean the same thing too. But they are not homographs. In listening to the joke, you cannot tell which spelling I’m using. The American spelled “tire” is also a homonym of the same word which means to either wear someone out or to be worn out, fatigued. This joke wouldn’t work at all with the British spelled TYRE. Every time I see this word spelled the British way, I have to look twice and try to remember what it means. So exactly what is going on in the cartoon? A muscular woman bike racer is riding down a street without holding her handlebars. She see a guy who, not in great physical shape, standing next to a bicycle and holding it up by the seat. She must be in a good mood because she yells to the guys, asking why he’s holding up his bicycle. He answers her, explaining that the bike is too tired to stand alone. This sounds like an obvious answer since the bike, only having two tires would fall down without human support. If it were a tricycle with three tires, it could, in fact, stand alone.  But there is a pun at work here, namely “tire” which can also be a verb and the adjectival form “tired,” as in exhausted, having no energy. When people are too tired to stand alone, they need human support. It appears that this bike has the same needs. And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

This joke was sent to me by my former singing buddy, Jim Offner.                                                     

 

Podcast - https://audioboom.com/boos/2516957-bike-psyche