PEAKING DUCK
 
What’s so funny about this? As you hear or read this joke, you may well be asking, “What hill are they talking about?” You might also conclude that the joke might be about real estate and figuring out which is a better location to place a house, over a hill, or under it. If you follow the news, then you realize that ‘under a hill’ could also be referring to a landslide or earthquake. In those cases the hill itself comes down and buries the house. But this is not a real estate joke and has nothing to do with houses, although, burial is a factor. The hill is a metaphor for life and time. We all live for a certain number of years. In our early years, as we develop, we learn many things; after we’ve learned them we put them to use. This can be physical knowledge like walking, running, biking, martial arts, climbing, etc or it can be intellectual knowledge that we learn in school or a trade or skill perhaps; or it can be an artistic skill such as writing, music or dancing. Eventually we arrive at the point, or perhaps several points in time that our various skills, talents and abilities peak, after that they start to decline, or “go downhill”.  Every person has their own peaks and valleys in life. If we were to draw a line graph representing these events, it would look like a hill or mountain. It starts low and moves higher and higher with several peaks and eventually it all goes downwards. That’s when we’re “over the hill,” that is, past our peaks, our prime time. On the other hand, being ‘under a hill,’ is a metaphor for being buried in the ground, which is what will happen after we die. So you can see why I say it’s still better to be over the hill than under it.  And THAT’s what’s so funny!
 
This joke was sent in by Bob Wiener 

Listen to my audioboo: https://audioboo.fm/boos/2082068-peaking-duck

PEAKING DUCK

 

What’s so funny about this? As you hear or read this joke, you may well be asking, “What hill are they talking about?” You might also conclude that the joke might be about real estate and figuring out which is a better location to place a house, over a hill, or under it. If you follow the news, then you realize that ‘under a hill’ could also be referring to a landslide or earthquake. In those cases the hill itself comes down and buries the house. But this is not a real estate joke and has nothing to do with houses, although, burial is a factor. The hill is a metaphor for life and time. We all live for a certain number of years. In our early years, as we develop, we learn many things; after we’ve learned them we put them to use. This can be physical knowledge like walking, running, biking, martial arts, climbing, etc or it can be intellectual knowledge that we learn in school or a trade or skill perhaps; or it can be an artistic skill such as writing, music or dancing. Eventually we arrive at the point, or perhaps several points in time that our various skills, talents and abilities peak, after that they start to decline, or “go downhill”.  Every person has their own peaks and valleys in life. If we were to draw a line graph representing these events, it would look like a hill or mountain. It starts low and moves higher and higher with several peaks and eventually it all goes downwards. That’s when we’re “over the hill,” that is, past our peaks, our prime time. On the other hand, being ‘under a hill,’ is a metaphor for being buried in the ground, which is what will happen after we die. So you can see why I say it’s still better to be over the hill than under it.  And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

This joke was sent in by Bob Wiener

Listen to my audioboo: https://audioboo.fm/boos/2082068-peaking-duck

PHOTO OP

What’s so funny about this? It’s good to pun using new words. “Selfie” is definitely a post 2000 word. In fact, it’s not much older than a year or two. It’s completely understandable and the concept of self-involvement is nothing new; we just have a new word for it. People who came of age in the 1970’s were labeled members of the “Me Generation”. Whereas the 60’s were years of political activism, anti-war movements, civil rights, feminism,  sexual liberation, gay liberation etc. - social causes involving societal change. In the 1970’s people became cynical about the changes that didn’t come about in the previous decade. Oh, there were plenty of changes, just not as massive as some hoped. In short, the revolution was not televised because there was no revolution. So in the 70’s people turned to gurus, self-development, business, money and their own pleasures. I’m not going to go through every decade since then. However, since the development of the internet and cell phone technology coupled with social media, we now have self-involvement taken to a hitherto unknown scale. People have plastered their entire lives all over facebook, as if anyone really cared. Once all their existing photos were digitized, it was only natural to start taking more and newer pictures. Cell phones all come equipped with still and video cameras making it ridiculously easy to take more and more pictures of stuff people are interested in. And it looks like they are mostly interested in themselves; hence we now have “The Selfie Generation”. In the joke we have the pun of someone picturing themselves, that is, imagining themselves taking pictures of themselves. In the photo we can see by the girl’s face that she is not interested in her room or how it looks, or anything else for that matter. There is only one thing on her mind, and that is herselfie. And THAT’s what’s so funny! 

 

This joke came from punoftheday.com

Listen to my audioboo: https://audioboo.fm/boos/2079266-photo-op

PHOTO OP

What’s so funny about this? It’s good to pun using new words. “Selfie” is definitely a post 2000 word. In fact, it’s not much older than a year or two. It’s completely understandable and the concept of self-involvement is nothing new; we just have a new word for it. People who came of age in the 1970’s were labeled members of the “Me Generation”. Whereas the 60’s were years of political activism, anti-war movements, civil rights, feminism,  sexual liberation, gay liberation etc. - social causes involving societal change. In the 1970’s people became cynical about the changes that didn’t come about in the previous decade. Oh, there were plenty of changes, just not as massive as some hoped. In short, the revolution was not televised because there was no revolution. So in the 70’s people turned to gurus, self-development, business, money and their own pleasures. I’m not going to go through every decade since then. However, since the development of the internet and cell phone technology coupled with social media, we now have self-involvement taken to a hitherto unknown scale. People have plastered their entire lives all over facebook, as if anyone really cared. Once all their existing photos were digitized, it was only natural to start taking more and newer pictures. Cell phones all come equipped with still and video cameras making it ridiculously easy to take more and more pictures of stuff people are interested in. And it looks like they are mostly interested in themselves; hence we now have “The Selfie Generation”. In the joke we have the pun of someone picturing themselves, that is, imagining themselves taking pictures of themselves. In the photo we can see by the girl’s face that she is not interested in her room or how it looks, or anything else for that matter. There is only one thing on her mind, and that is herselfie. And THAT’s what’s so funny!

 

This joke came from punoftheday.com

Listen to my audioboo: https://audioboo.fm/boos/2079266-photo-op

linguisten:

The invention of language series: tense

linguisten:

The invention of language series: tense

My dog has a lot of potential, I just have to unleash it.
RATED PG

 


 

What’s so funny about this? Sometimes I think it’s not fair to the folks who take all these photos and post them to the web for their own perfectly good reasons. What may not be fair is that I take these photos and add my own captions to create memes for MY own perfectly good reasons, which usually have absolutely nothing to do with why the photo was originally taken.  Take today’s photo, for instance. We see a middle aged woman who is obviously unhappy with something, most likely the HOT plates she is holding. Maybe they don’t work well or at all.  Maybe they get too hot and her hands get burned. Whatever, she wants to make some point about the hot plates. What’s on MY mind is a spoonerism that came from my wife saying something about a hot PLATE, and being careful not to burn the table. Note the difference in stress between the two. This difference totally changes the meaning of the two words. My wife was talking about a plain old plate that was very hot, probably because it had been in the oven. So she stressed the word PLATE. But stressing the word HOT in this two word phrase changes the meaning to a small round cooking appliance, usually electrified. That’s what the woman in the photo is holding. When I spoonerized “hot plate” in my mind, I came up with “plot hate.” Next I had to invent a context for the spoonerism to make sense. The word “plot” immediately conjures up the image or a movie, novel, or play. So I scoured the web for the right image. 99% of what I saw were photos of hot plates, of all sizes and shapes, appearing alone, by themselves. If I was going to talk about a movie, I needed people. I found amazingly few images of people with hot plates, but I did find the expressive woman in today’s photo. So this woman is now the star of a faux or fake movie, entitled “Hot Plate”, and I’m a faux or fake movie critic, coming up with a clever way to say I didn’t like the movie’s story line, or plot, hence, “Plot Hate.” And THAT’s what’s so funny!

Listen to my audioboo:  https://audioboo.fm/boos/2076386-rated-pg

RATED PG

 

 

What’s so funny about this? Sometimes I think it’s not fair to the folks who take all these photos and post them to the web for their own perfectly good reasons. What may not be fair is that I take these photos and add my own captions to create memes for MY own perfectly good reasons, which usually have absolutely nothing to do with why the photo was originally taken.  Take today’s photo, for instance. We see a middle aged woman who is obviously unhappy with something, most likely the HOT plates she is holding. Maybe they don’t work well or at all.  Maybe they get too hot and her hands get burned. Whatever, she wants to make some point about the hot plates. What’s on MY mind is a spoonerism that came from my wife saying something about a hot PLATE, and being careful not to burn the table. Note the difference in stress between the two. This difference totally changes the meaning of the two words. My wife was talking about a plain old plate that was very hot, probably because it had been in the oven. So she stressed the word PLATE. But stressing the word HOT in this two word phrase changes the meaning to a small round cooking appliance, usually electrified. That’s what the woman in the photo is holding. When I spoonerized “hot plate” in my mind, I came up with “plot hate.” Next I had to invent a context for the spoonerism to make sense. The word “plot” immediately conjures up the image or a movie, novel, or play. So I scoured the web for the right image. 99% of what I saw were photos of hot plates, of all sizes and shapes, appearing alone, by themselves. If I was going to talk about a movie, I needed people. I found amazingly few images of people with hot plates, but I did find the expressive woman in today’s photo. So this woman is now the star of a faux or fake movie, entitled “Hot Plate”, and I’m a faux or fake movie critic, coming up with a clever way to say I didn’t like the movie’s story line, or plot, hence, “Plot Hate.” And THAT’s what’s so funny!

Listen to my audioboo:  https://audioboo.fm/boos/2076386-rated-pg

philspancake:

callino-fucking-way:

jacobtheloofah:

i wanna make a cartoon about a spanish pig who always questions things

it’ll be called por qué pig

image

THAT IS SO CUTE

linguisten:

The invention of language series: subjunctive

linguisten:

The invention of language series: subjunctive

OH DEAR
 
WHAT DO YOU CALL A DEER WITHOUT AN EYE? 
 
What’s so funny about this? I have to keep reminding myself that nothing is too sacred or immune from being joked about, certainly not death, nor god, but a blind deer? How cruel and unusual, mean and low-down, in bad taste is that? I know, I know. Nevertheless, I’m plunging ahead ‘cuz I think it’s funny and I’ll just have to take my lumps, or suffer the consequences. Hey, I have nothing against deer. I oppose hunting them and some of my best friends are dears, even if that’s spelled the other way. Oh well…So here we have our mean spirited riddle, asking for another name for a poor deer who has lost the sight of at least one eye. Fortunately for us, the photo shows only one side of the deer’s face and we can avoid knowing whether or not the deer is completely blind or at least has one good eye. In the wild, any creature depending on the sight of two eyes will be a goner if it loses both of them. With one at least they stand a fighting chance. Now for the corny part - the response or answer is a pun meaning “I don’t know.” The guy is saying “I have no idea,” but it’s said in a dialect that puts an “r” sound after an “ah” sound.  The most famous person to ever do this was President John F. Kennedy, especially when he talked about the island nation of  “Cuber” (i.e. Cuba).  The flip, or reverse side of this New England dialect is to subtract the “r” from words ending in “r,” or having an “ar” combination in the middle. Examples are “cah” for car, and “yahd” for “yard.” The word “idea” has a number of dialectical pronunciations, including “idee” and “ide-a”). The latter is how I say it. The “ah” sound is barely perceptible but enough so that a New Englander will say “ideer.” So we can pun this by spelling it e-y-e  d-e-e-r. If we add the word “no” to it, we get “no eye-deer”, a deer with no eye and the answer to the riddle. And, I guess, THAT’s what’s so funny!

Listen to my audioboo: https://audioboo.fm/boos/2073130-oh-dear

OH DEAR

 

WHAT DO YOU CALL A DEER WITHOUT AN EYE?

 

What’s so funny about this? I have to keep reminding myself that nothing is too sacred or immune from being joked about, certainly not death, nor god, but a blind deer? How cruel and unusual, mean and low-down, in bad taste is that? I know, I know. Nevertheless, I’m plunging ahead ‘cuz I think it’s funny and I’ll just have to take my lumps, or suffer the consequences. Hey, I have nothing against deer. I oppose hunting them and some of my best friends are dears, even if that’s spelled the other way. Oh well…So here we have our mean spirited riddle, asking for another name for a poor deer who has lost the sight of at least one eye. Fortunately for us, the photo shows only one side of the deer’s face and we can avoid knowing whether or not the deer is completely blind or at least has one good eye. In the wild, any creature depending on the sight of two eyes will be a goner if it loses both of them. With one at least they stand a fighting chance. Now for the corny part - the response or answer is a pun meaning “I don’t know.” The guy is saying “I have no idea,” but it’s said in a dialect that puts an “r” sound after an “ah” sound.  The most famous person to ever do this was President John F. Kennedy, especially when he talked about the island nation of  “Cuber” (i.e. Cuba).  The flip, or reverse side of this New England dialect is to subtract the “r” from words ending in “r,” or having an “ar” combination in the middle. Examples are “cah” for car, and “yahd” for “yard.” The word “idea” has a number of dialectical pronunciations, including “idee” and “ide-a”). The latter is how I say it. The “ah” sound is barely perceptible but enough so that a New Englander will say “ideer.” So we can pun this by spelling it e-y-e  d-e-e-r. If we add the word “no” to it, we get “no eye-deer”, a deer with no eye and the answer to the riddle. And, I guess, THAT’s what’s so funny!

Listen to my audioboo: https://audioboo.fm/boos/2073130-oh-dear

CAN YOU GUESS THE EXPRESSION?
Click a button on the right to:

Guess the idiom


Get a hint


Get a choice of idioms/meaning


Get complete information


Get the answer

If you like guessing our idioms or learning about their origins be sure to check out our ENGLISH IDIOMS INTERACTIVE APP on ITunes. 
http://bit.ly/1hZ08bz
http://bit.ly/1lMFnnk

CAN YOU GUESS THE EXPRESSION?

Click a button on the right to:

  • Guess the idiom

  • Get a hint

  • Get a choice of idioms/meaning

  • Get complete information

  • Get the answer

If you like guessing our idioms or learning about their origins be sure to check out our ENGLISH IDIOMS INTERACTIVE APP on ITunes.

http://bit.ly/1hZ08bz

http://bit.ly/1lMFnnk